SMF - Just Installed!
Username  
Password
Pages: 1 [2]
  Print  
Author Topic: Decision to assassinate ?  (Read 1158 times)
Roger Norton
Guest
« Reply #15 on: June 08, 2011, 05:57:26 AM »

Actually that was improper at the time for a woman to visit a man's room alone.

From the John Surratt trial here is Louis Weichmann's testimony about Mary Surratt's visit to Powell at the Herndon House. Nora Fitzpatrick also testified about Mary's visit to the Herndon House, so Weichmann has corroboration on his testimony. I would love to know what this visit was about, and it makes me even more doubtful as to her "poor eyesight" when Powell showed up the night she was arrested.

I'd give my wife's car to somehow go back in time and be in Powell's room to overhear the conversation between these two folks.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------


Q. In going from any church ; I do not know the names of the churches
here?

A On Sundays she went to St. Aloysius. During Lent there were evening
services  at St. Patrick's during week-days, and she went there.

Q. Did you go with her to church at any time, and returning, stop anywhere?
I do not remember the dates. You will give them.

A. Yes. sir. After the 27th, I do not remember the particular evening, Anna
Surratt, Miss Jenkins, Miss Fitzpatrick, Mrs. Surratt, and I, had been to St.
Patrick's church, on the corner of Tenth and F streets.

Q What occurred in returning?

A. On returning she stopped at the Hemdon House, at the comer of Ninth and
F streets. She went into the Hemdon House, and said that she was going in
there to see Payne.

Q. Mrs. Surratt said that?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Tell what occurred?

A. She did go, and she came out.

Q. How long was she in there?

A. Perhaps twenty minutes.

Q. Did you see her when she came out?

A. Yes, sir.

Q. Where were you waiting?

A We walked down Ninth street to E— the party did — and down E to Tenth;
then returned to the comer of Ninth and F, and met Mrs. Surratt just as she
was coming out of the Hemdon House.

Q. Did she join you?

A. Yes, sir; and went home with us.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2011, 06:11:08 AM by Roger Norton » Logged
Linda Anderson
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 277


Fanny Seward


View Profile
« Reply #16 on: June 08, 2011, 09:21:45 AM »

Thanks, Betty for reminding us of the social customs of the nineteenth century. At that point,  Mary must have been beyond caring about appearances. 
Logged
Dr. Modestino
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 79


Good at relieving Yankee paymasters of greenbacks


View Profile WWW
« Reply #17 on: June 08, 2011, 09:25:01 AM »

It does make her appear suspicious in such a case!  That is for sure.  In the 21st century, it would mean nothing. But, 145 years ago, people would think all kinds of wrong about it.  A woman going to a man's room?  Can you imagine the implications?  So, unless she was having an affair with him, it seems to suggest she was in on it!
Logged

"In battle, in the fullness of pride and strength, little recks the soldier whether the hissing bullet sings his sudden requiem or the cords of life are severed by the sharp steel."  Seargent Smith Prentiss, 1847
asobbingfilm
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 60


Mr President, Can I get you a table or a Booth?


View Profile WWW
« Reply #18 on: June 08, 2011, 05:27:20 PM »

Although I know there will be some disagreement with me here I believe that Booths decision to kill AL had a short shelf life. Had he missed his chance on Easter weekend I think it is quite possible that he he may have woke up one morning the following week and said "to hell with it" and moved on. Perhaps I underestimate his resolve me thinks. Wink Can you imagine how the USA would be different today had Lincoln served his second term?
Logged
asobbingfilm
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 60


Mr President, Can I get you a table or a Booth?


View Profile WWW
« Reply #19 on: June 08, 2011, 06:08:17 PM »

Laurie,

   You could have worked at said liquor store. I would gladly buy my margarita fixins from you any day !!!

David
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]
  Print  
 
Jump to: