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Author Topic: What Books First Made an Impression on You as an Intro to the Assassination?  (Read 1971 times)
Deb54
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« Reply #15 on: May 27, 2011, 08:09:00 PM »

The Man Who Killed Lincoln (by Francis Wilson) was my first Booth book.  I was very young and this old book kindled my lifelong interest in the subject. 
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Philip G
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« Reply #16 on: May 27, 2011, 08:12:59 PM »

When I was young, I read Bishop's book.  But I was not obsessed.  Years later I read the Young Adult book "The Lincoln Murder Plot" by Karen Zeinert.  It had a bibliography which included "Mary Surratt: An American Tragedy".  Trindal's book ignited the fire for me.   Soon after I read "Alias Paine" and so it goes.    
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Sara Watkins
Thomas Thorne
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« Reply #17 on: May 27, 2011, 09:15:17 PM »

                I first read George S Bryan's "The Great American Myth." I moved on to the Thomas/Hyman Stanton bio ,Bishop,Eisenschiml,Roscoe,Shelton and the Ray Neff inspired insanities.  My reading trail made me appreciate Henry Adams' remark that the "progression of the American presidency from Washington to Grant proved that Darwin was wrong." 
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Dave Taylor
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« Reply #18 on: May 27, 2011, 10:48:35 PM »

My introduction to the Assassination is so different from all I read here, I HAVE TO chirp a little. I bought some acreage in King George County that became my farm, in 1980, and scraped  the ground for a septic field. We uncovered belt buckles, bullets, shrapnel, etc. What's This?  A neighbor referred me to a man named William A. Tidwell, who owned and operated a vineyard, nearby. he would know. We arranged a meeting ( no house yet ). When I arrived (from Alexandria) there was another man here, his name was James O. Hall, finally Bill arived. We stood there for hours, while they showd me how Booth (Who He?) came out of the Nanjemoy and went around Mathias Point. They told me this farm was the spycamp.  The first books I read were the King George County Deed books. Then the Potomac Flotilla Log Books. I learned some stuff that they didn't know. The first book I OWNED, was "Come Retribution", only because my name was in it. It all started there, and never eased up. I am so proud of these events and the results, I can't express myself. I'll have to tell you about the "Mail Drop" that I found, and they confirmed,at another time. How can I not continue to research?

John, I know you've posted this before, but I am still fascinated by your story and the things you have found.  Truly remarkable, sir.  What wonderful experiences you have had.
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saxpower
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« Reply #19 on: May 27, 2011, 10:52:48 PM »

20 Days for me, too
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Wesley Harris
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« Reply #20 on: May 27, 2011, 11:24:45 PM »

I first got interested in the Kennedy assassination in high school after receiving a copy of Four Days: The Historical Record of the Death of President Kennedy.   That took me to The Day Kennedy was Shot and I corresponded with Dr. John Lattimer for a school project and he sent me some of his research on both the Kennedy and Lincoln assassinations.  The Day Lincoln was Shot was my first Lincoln book.

The book that motivated me to conduct my own research on the conspirators' weapons and write my own was American Brutus, a truly amazing work.
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Randal
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« Reply #21 on: May 28, 2011, 05:20:33 AM »

I first got interested in the Kennedy assassination in high school after receiving a copy of Four Days: The Historical Record of the Death of President Kennedy.   That took me to The Day Kennedy was Shot and I corresponded with Dr. John Lattimer for a school project and he sent me some of his research on both the Kennedy and Lincoln assassinations.  The Day Lincoln was Shot was my first Lincoln book.

The book that motivated me to conduct my own research on the conspirators' weapons and write my own was American Brutus,[/u] a truly amazing work.

Amen!
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historynut1123
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« Reply #22 on: May 28, 2011, 07:33:23 AM »

At first I was going to say it was "Manhunt," but then I remembered back when I was a college kid (1992?) I was sitting in the campus library bored and happened to check out "The Lincoln Assassination Conspiracies" by William Hanchett. That was the book where I learned the whole story, that people were hanged for involvement with Booth, that Seward was also attacked, etc. It was a good basic introduction.
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"But hark! The doorbell rings and Mr.J.W. Booth is announced. And listen to the scamperings. Such brushing and fixing."-letter of John Surratt, observing sister Anna
midnitelamp
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« Reply #23 on: May 28, 2011, 04:42:42 PM »

When Lincoln Died,Ralph Borreson.
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Randal
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« Reply #24 on: May 28, 2011, 04:48:07 PM »

When Lincoln Died,Ralph Borreson.

ohhh, another good book!
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NJREB1863
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« Reply #25 on: May 30, 2011, 09:47:41 AM »

For me, the Jim Bishop book sparked my interest, but reading Twenty Days for the first time years ago brought me back in time to April 1865. I must say that American Brutus and Blood on the Moon are the first books I recommend to anyone looking to learn about the assassination.
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Tony
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« Reply #26 on: June 07, 2011, 03:26:59 PM »

Hi Betty,
I was re-reading your excellent book and came across your discussion of Maj. Eckert's efforts to obtain information from Powell and refer to D.H. Bates book "Lincoln in the Telegraph Office".  Bates discusses Eckert's efforts to communicate with Powell and mentions something that I had never heard before, specifically, how Eckert, while riding a street car in NY in November of 1864, found a packet of unopened letters, one of which was addressed to Payne from JWB discussing the plot to kidnap AL.  During Eckert's talks with Powell, he admitted that the letter was indeed his and he had lost it sometime before.   He also admitted to Eckert that he was asked to take part in the burning of hotels in NYC but decided not to because he did not want anyone to get hurt.  I do understand that this is coming from Bates many years later but have you done any investigating into this story?
Thanks
Chuckciao
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asobbingfilm
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« Reply #27 on: June 08, 2011, 05:29:42 PM »

Well my first is still best-----Bishop !! He started this whole journey for me.
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Dr. Modestino
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« Reply #28 on: June 08, 2011, 05:44:03 PM »

Ownsbey and Weichmann's books
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"In battle, in the fullness of pride and strength, little recks the soldier whether the hissing bullet sings his sudden requiem or the cords of life are severed by the sharp steel."  Seargent Smith Prentiss, 1847
Dr. Modestino
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« Reply #29 on: June 08, 2011, 06:04:05 PM »

I told the truth!
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"In battle, in the fullness of pride and strength, little recks the soldier whether the hissing bullet sings his sudden requiem or the cords of life are severed by the sharp steel."  Seargent Smith Prentiss, 1847
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