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Author Topic: another retrial of Mrs. Surratt, this time in Chicago  (Read 1765 times)
Steven G. Miller
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« on: July 08, 2011, 05:32:08 AM »

Chicago's Harold Washington Library will be the scene of a mock retrial of Mary Surratt in Septmember of this year:

http://stlouis.cbslocal.com/2011/07/08/historic-retrials-set-for-abe-lincoln-conspirator-surratt/

What do you think, Chicago area boothies? Think you can make it in to cheer for your favorite side? Dave Taylor, Joe Geringer: I'm talking to you.
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Dave Taylor
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« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2011, 09:52:38 AM »

Looks interesting, Steve.  I'll bring my air horn and a big foam finger that says guilty.
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Randal
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« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2011, 02:59:02 PM »

Looks interesting, Steve.  I'll bring my air horn and a big foam finger that says guilty.

Guilty of what Huh
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Dave Taylor
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« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2011, 04:59:23 PM »

Oh, anything at all really.  I'd even settle for jay walking...
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Randal
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« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2011, 05:27:29 PM »

ah, one of those Kate Larson types  Grin

Really, I agree she's guilty of knowing and participating in the kidnap plot, but the Randal Jury is out on her knowledge about the assassination. Really. Cheesy
« Last Edit: July 08, 2011, 05:36:49 PM by Randal » Logged
Kate Larson
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« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2011, 08:28:54 AM »

Dave, you're a man after my own heart!

I wonder who will be the lucky Illinois attorney's playing the parts of Clampitt and Aiken? Blagoivich's attorney's?! Lol!

Sorry, could't help myself!
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Richard Petersen
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« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2011, 08:42:22 AM »

Don't take the innocent verdict for granted.
Judge James Zagel is known as a tough but fair Federal Judge.
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emma1231
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« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2011, 09:27:49 AM »

 (I think I am properly registered now  and can participate in this great site.   (I had trouble doing it some time ago but think I have fixed the problem.  Hi, Randall, Betty, Steve,  Laurie, and everyone else!)
 I wish I could attend that "trial".   A presentation about Weichmann and Lloyd, with Q & A,  was presented in Phila. a couple of mos. back, and it was a big disappointment.   The two men merely gave well- memorized 15 min. monologues and then took questions.   They were excellent in their roles, but I drove all the way from L.I  just for that?    There was a framework to it all that was ridiculous, and an intro of  45 mins. that had nothing whatsoever to do with the case.  ( I still can't figure out what THAT was all about.)  But I asked Weichmann a couple of pointed questions, corrected him about one matter,  and then told him what I thought of him.  That went over beautifully w/ the audience. "Lou" could only reiterate from part of his monologue.   (Frank Hebblethwaite -- who attended with me, my wife,  and Art Candenquist --later told me I sounded like I believed in Mrs. Surratt's innocence.   Not so; the audience had to be shown that Lou has been accused of knowing too much to have been  lilly--white.)   Th actor kept his cool and I complimented him afterwards.   No hard feelings.
   I am presenting my own  two-man play about Weichmann and Oldroyd for the Lincoln Group of NY on Nov.22nd.   ($55, buffet dinner, cash bar.)  Surratt Society (life) member John Howard plays Oldroyd to my Weichmann.  Yes, we did it at the 2009 Surratt Soc. Conference, but when I saw "The Conspirator," I said I just had to revise it and fill in some of the movie's gaps about Weichmann.   I also do to Weichmann what I did to him in Philadelphia, but more extensively  -- be more assertive and ask some tougher questions than I asked (as Oldroyd) two years ago..    Whereas the Phila. Weichmann wasn't equipped to give much of a rebuttal, the Weichmann in my play becomes more defensive and upset.  All of his retorts are his actual quotes.  It's got more conflict in it now.   It takes place in Oldroyd's museum in the House Where Lincoln Died, where they actually met in 1901!)   If anyone out there cares to see it, drop me an email and I'll email you the particulars.    SInce its more than 15 mins. long (it's an hour!), John and I can't be expected to memorize our lines.   We read form our scripts, but we are so familiar with it by now and by "curtain" time that we won''t have to bury our faces in the script.   We keep eye contact, we have stage blocking (walking into the 2 parlors and the deathbed room), and use props.  John and I are very excited about doing this revised edition for the NY Lincoln Group. Hey, we're not professionals, but we think/hope  it's interesting enough to be worth while.
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Randal
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« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2011, 09:30:58 AM »

Glad you figured it out Richard (the site) I wish I could be there, and oh, and break a leg! (I know, bad pun) Wink
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emma1231
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« Reply #9 on: November 12, 2011, 10:36:55 AM »

Laurie -- I am not only a charter membr of the Lincoln Groupo of NY; I am one of its five founders!  (together with Larry West, Harold Holzer, and the late Bill Kaland and George Craig.)  And I served as its president for twelve years.
   John Howard and I held three final rehearsals for my two-man play, "The Witness & the Collector" yesterday afternoon, and when we finished, we looked at ea. other in amazement, and both felt that we had  created something wonderful, despite not being profssional actors.   We think we really carry it off, emotionally, without being hammy.  We have  edited it down to an hour, and have found the right formula/approach/ attitudes, etc;  We are both terribly excited about performing it on Nov.22 for the LGNY.  I hope we fill in some of the gaps we witnessed in "The Conspirator," and inform the audience.   (In an hour time frame, I couldn't touch all of the  bases, of course.)

       I'd like to share one thing with everyone here and ask if anyone can help me.     I really wanted to take photos of the front and the rear parlors , and the deathbed room in the house where Lincoln died and blow them up (to 36" x 40") and mount them on display boards that same size.   You know the kind -- they have two wings that fold in to enable them to stand unsupported.  I would take them, with the wings unfolded, and display them on easels behind us in the three areas of our stage representing  these three rooms of the house.  Since the action takes place when Oldroyd was displaying his collection in the house, I ONLY can use photos showing his relics, display cases, statues, busts, and furniture scattered all over the place.   (Looks like my Lincoln room, come to think of it!) I can't use pictures that have appeared in old magazines or in Oldroyd's brochures, because they have those dots/screens on them, and when blown up to that size they look just awful.  (I tried it!)  They have to be actual photographs.  Believe it or not, there are no such photos in existence. (The exception being the room in which Lincoln died.)    Searches have been made of photos of the two parlors (dur. Oldroyd's tenure)  in the Libr. of Cong., the Ford's Thea. collection, the NPS Capitol Region, the Nat'l Archives, the old Lincoln Museum in Ft. Wayne (now at a library in Indiana), and the Univ. of Chicago, where the Oldroyd Papers are deposited.   If anyone has, or knows  where I can find such pictures,  would you please contact me immediately.
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