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Author Topic: Sunday Survey for January 29, 2012  (Read 689 times)
BoothBuff
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« on: January 28, 2012, 11:41:40 PM »

     Welcome to the Sunday Survey for Jan. 29, 2012.       
     Randal has asked me to fill in for him.


     There has been much discussion and opinion here regarding who was unfairly prosecuted for their role in the Lincoln assassination.

      Mr. Kauffman explains in American Brutus that while scores of arrests were made, Stanton's threat to impose a blanket death sentence policy was basically a bluff. Many people were held only as witnesses and others for offenses that were misdemeanors. Also mentioned was that some of those incarcerated were held on the word of African Americans. Courts had only recently begun to allow their testimony, but social prejudices made juries unlikely to convict a white man on the word of one who may have at one time been a slave.

     With that in mind and disregarding the social prejudices of the era, who else who had knowledge of Booth's crime and assisted him in any way do you think should and could have been prosecuted?
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Randal
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« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2012, 06:12:00 AM »

Richard Smoot and James Brawner. They both had beforehand knowledge of the kidnap plot that eventually turned to murder. It's been said here many times, southern marylanders were aware something was cooking regarding Lincoln. Sarah Slater HAD to know something was afoot.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2012, 06:36:23 AM by Randal » Logged

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BoothBuff
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« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2012, 06:52:27 AM »

     What makes things murky is who knew, without a doubt, a murder was going to be or had been committed. If it could be proven that that was the case, they qualify for the iron hand. Thomas Jones, Wm. Jett, A.R. Bainbridge and Mortimer Ruggles, put this hood on and step to the edge of the platform.       
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TimB
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« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2012, 10:19:30 AM »

I would have to add Samuel Cox into the mix, too. In the end, who really know why some didnít have to face the consequences for their actions while other did? Thatís just a rhetorical question.
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Randal
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« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2012, 11:02:46 AM »

I agree about Harbin. He was standing beside Surratt when they haggled over Smoot's boat. Harbin know* what the plan was.


*knew
« Last Edit: January 29, 2012, 11:44:02 AM by Randal » Logged

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John Stanton
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« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2012, 07:01:02 PM »

This is a good question. I hope we don't let it die. Why didn't anyone in King George have their feet put to the fire? Half the population was involved in some way, and no one was punished.  Steuart,Quesenberry, Arnold, Cawood, Conrad, Bryant, Jett, Ruggles, Bainbridge, Dade, Harbin (he did his work here), Crismond. Do you want more?
IMO I never found a inference that Slater knew anything. If she was a good "Mule", she didn't know what was in the envelopes. (IMO Money drafts, but not GOLD.)She was as guilty as any in the above Roll Call. She, as well as the above, lived in the open, readily available, after the war. They had no problems. Because we didn't know where Sarah was, does not mean that the Feds didn't know. They didn't want her.  Conrad and Dade are known double Agents. How about some of the others? Did they trade info for freedom? Did the squeeler, whoever that was, tell the Feds where to find Booth and also tell that these people  were involved with the abduction bit not the Assassination.  Conrad said in his book that he was arrestedd and put in with the conspirators. Then the warden came by and let hime go home for the weekend -on the warden's own horse. COnrad came back on Monday morning as scheduled. He didn't have a worry. WHy?
If I may paraphrase Powell " We, (us, today), don't have the half of them." We don't know who worked for which side.
The Feds knew about the abduction and chose to ignore it. IMO, they wanted to spend their time on work that could be easily proven and the result would be Hangings. The abduction was small potatoes. Most of these people were involved with the Abduction and were not worthy of their time.
Did you know that the Rebs had a spy in the U. S. Secret Service own front office? Did He point fingers at some and not others? He was never arrested, in fact he worked for Conrad, and married Dade.
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Randal
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« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2012, 07:19:34 PM »

I would assume Slater knew of the kidnap plot, she was in and out of the boarding house with John Jr. when it WAS the plan. Both being operatives, i'm sure they shared information.
 I thought the Fed's looked for her after Atzerodts statement, but she vanished when she got a whiff they were looking for her?
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John Stanton
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« Reply #7 on: January 29, 2012, 09:10:10 PM »

Randal. IF Sarah and John were "good" operatives, they did not share information. See James Fowle's testimony at the Boutwell hearings, "Operatives kept to themselves and did not share information, and didn't know what the others were doing." That does not assure that they didn't talk shop, but it tightens up the possibility that they did talk. I find nothing either way.  From testimony given in court at Sarah's divorce,  Sarah arrived in NYC in May '65 and lived with Rowan in Manhattan. (As did her Brother and Mother.) However, they are not listed in the NYC Directory for that time frame I need to resolve that short comming. Then she traveled with Surratt from 24 March through Aprol 18 (My opinion, based on facts). This is when Surratt was trying to distance himself from Booth.  This is a situation that isn't resolved - Did Surratt, or Sarah, know there was to be an assassination?  I say. NO, they didn't know. Do you think we will ever know?
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Randal
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« Reply #8 on: January 29, 2012, 09:15:55 PM »

I don't think Sarah or John knew there was to be a killing on the 14th. But other conspirators along with Weichmann  during the planning of the kidnap plot, saw Sarah, with Johnny-boy, at the boarding house.
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Thomas Thorne
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« Reply #9 on: January 29, 2012, 10:44:17 PM »

                   With that in mind and disregarding the social prejudices of the era, who else who had knowledge of Booth's crime and assisted him in any way do you think should and could have been prosecuted?
                Anyone who knowingly harbored or assisted JWB in his escape-which is a considerable list-should have been tried ,found guilty and imprisoned. 
               Tom
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John Stanton
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« Reply #10 on: January 30, 2012, 12:07:55 AM »

Randal, you are taxing my feeble brain.  I can't rememeber dates too well. Sarah was at the Surratt House in late Feb. 65, but no Johnny. That is when Weichmann saw her in the veil. She came by again in March about the 24th, and she and Johnny went to Richmond together ("Surratt had woman on the brain"). That was the first time they had met. By that time the plot was murder and neither of them knew it. I THINK, that they never met when it was abduction. I don't know when the first plans were laid, but I think they changed after Booth took off for NY, and he brought her back to DC on the 24th of March. She and Johnny stayed together until April 18th. Neither one of them saw Booth in this time frame. Do you know of any other meetings? If she knew of the abduction, it didn't come from Johnny. She might have known from someone in Richmond or in Montreal.  Ouch, this thinking hurts.
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