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Author Topic: What if Herold had not abandoned Powell at Sewards mansion?  (Read 4084 times)
Jim Page
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« Reply #45 on: June 13, 2012, 07:57:15 AM »

Hey, Gene--

DC is almost as bad as Atlanta! I remember one time a client from Florida was driving me to a restaurant in Georgetown, or trying to, and he kept seeing the big M (indicating Metro) on every street sign and saying, "No matter how many times I turn, I still end up on M Street!"

Did you have lunch at the Surratt (boarding) House on H Street? My daughter says it's called Wok 'n' Roll or some such name now. I've been there to look at the building but never went inside. Of course, I've been to the Surratt Tavern location five times now, but've never been inside it, either!!!

--Jim

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Gene C
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« Reply #46 on: June 13, 2012, 08:02:55 AM »

Jim,
You're right about Atlanta.  Every other street is named Peachtree something. Peachtree Street, Peachtree Ave, Peachtree Blvd.  (then add to that North, South, East & West)
I was just making a little joke about the restaurant, since Powell wondered around lost and then ended up at Surrat's boarding house.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2012, 08:09:31 AM by Gene C » Logged

The more you know, the more you think the less you know, because you know that you don't know.  The less you know the more you think the more you know, because you don't know that you don't know. 
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Joe Gleason
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« Reply #47 on: June 13, 2012, 09:04:50 AM »

Don't feel bad guys, everyone gets lost in DC !  I think they designed the city that way to trap the tourists.  Cheesy  Gene, I agree that Powell was lost. If he had continued north, near Fort Saratoga, he would have been out of Washington and headed striaght towards Baltimore. Why he would go back to the boardinghouse is beyond me. Even without his horse, he could have made it out of the city just north of Fort Bunker Hill/Saratoga.
   
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J Madonna
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« Reply #48 on: June 13, 2012, 08:08:17 PM »

As you all know, I believe Herold was assigned to be the assassin of Johnson. Atzerodt was not going to do it and Booth knew it so he gave the job to Herold. Herold, from what I've read, was a young man of lower than average intelligence who hero worshiped Booth. He could have been talked into it by Booth far easier than Atzerodt.

At this point we need to make clear what was planned and what occurred as a result of circumstances.
Anything that happened before 10pm was planned. After that it was every man for himself.

If you look at what was planned you can readily see that Atzerodt was going to be sacrificed when Herold purposely left Booth's jacket containing the map southward in his room. I believe that Booth meant to lure the posse southward by throwing enough red meat to the wolves following him.  He mentioned the southward route to the guard at the bridge and even had Mary Surratt leave his field glasses along the trail. Meanwhile, he would turn northward and use the train system to escape to Canada.

When Herold was unable to kill Johnson because he stupidly left his gun in Atzerodt' s locked room, he took off after Booth like a lost dog after his master. Booth never planned on traveling with Herold because one man can blend easier into a crowd than 2 or 3. Booth's broken leg was his unforeseen circumstance that allowed Herold to catch up with him and help him get treatment.

Thats how I see it. Booth didn't give a rip about anybody but himself and his own escape. Mary Surratt, Lewis Powell, Davy Herold and George Atzerodt were all to be sacrificed....and they were.

BTW - Does anyone know whatever happened to Booth's field glasses?

Jerry 
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Joe Gleason
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« Reply #49 on: June 27, 2012, 09:20:46 AM »

The one-eyed horse that Lewis Powell was riding on the night of the assassination was in the hands of the authorities by 2:00am. He wasn't arrested until the 18th, so how was he getting around? It is possible that he "aquired" another horse, maybe even a Yankee horse! After Thomas Price found Lew Powell's coat near Saratoga Hospital on Sunday, he apparently tried to track it to it's source.

Thomas Price
3rd Mass.
Ft. Bunker Hill

      I looked around for a track coming from the coat; There was a track of a horse there; The footprints were discernible; The road is grassy there. I went back  and tried to trace the track. I went to the coat first. I then came back to the hospital and saw two men in the invalid dress at the hospital and they represented themselves to be from Harewood Hospital. One of them was a tall man, dark hair& rather thick black eyes and he alighted from his horse. Said I, " Those are pretty good conditioned horses, the best I ever saw in the United States, almost. They are hospital horses I will bet."  I thought there was something suspicious when I saw the next morning in the paper the description of the man that attempted Mr. Seward's life. This man had a very black eye. When he saw me looking at him he turned his back toward me".




 
                
« Last Edit: June 27, 2012, 09:23:56 AM by Joe Gleason » Logged
BCorbett1865
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« Reply #50 on: June 27, 2012, 12:52:59 PM »

Hey Joe,

You bring up a good question. How did Powell get around after losing or ditching his horse? Betty might have some insight into this question. I have always found it quite amazing that he spent three days roaming around Washington and never raised a blip of suspicion until he showed up at the boarding house. First of all he must have eaten something. Where did he get his food and water? Three days is a long time to go without eating anything. Did Powell know anyone else in Washington besides Mary Surratt that would have possibly helped him? Interesting to speculate.

Craig
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Barry Doohan
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« Reply #51 on: June 28, 2012, 06:04:12 AM »

I don't believe that Powell was completely at a loss duing the three days. I would think that his time with the ANV and Mosby would allow him to handle the elements and lack of food. Obviously, these were not the US Rangers but he should have learned some survival skills. The distance from the fall of his horse to the Surratt boarding house was not too difficult to cover in three days. Given the nature of Washington with the large number of Union soldiers and the crowds that had surged into Washington to celebrate the surrender, his height and his odd headwear might have been the largest risk of blending into the crowd. I have always thought he just stayed on the outskirts or hid in the woods and brush and went to Mary Surratt for assistance/advice after dark on April 17. He might as he stated even hid out among the transients at the railroad yards.
What I've never been able to comprehend is, with his experience with Mosby, how he failed to notice the activity of the detectives and failed to case the boarding house before going to the door.
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Randal
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« Reply #52 on: June 28, 2012, 06:46:33 AM »

He Detectives were on the second floor, Powell was on the ground level. From what I recall, there was 1 detective stationed outside who was assumedly dressed in civvies and had orders to let anyone IN, but bar anyone from leaving unless accompanied by a Detective.
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Joe Gleason
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« Reply #53 on: June 28, 2012, 07:25:43 AM »

Craig, Barry, I think you guys are right. Powell was moving about in the same area around the Soldiers Home, Glenwood Cemetery and Harewood Hospital for a good while. Harewood Hospital was on 7th Street which would have made it fairly easy for Powell to find the Surratt boarding house at 7th & H. My guess is that he at least found shelter in that area when it began to rain.

He was still in the city and he needed to blend in somehow.
 
                                      
                

1. Surratt's                                                              Soper's Hill located approx. 8 mi. south
2. Seward's                                                             of Navy Yard Bridge
3. Powell's horse
4. Glenwood
5. FT. Saratoga
6. FT. Bunker Hil



                                                                                            




« Last Edit: June 28, 2012, 03:26:53 PM by Joe Gleason » Logged
BeckyH
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« Reply #54 on: September 24, 2012, 09:36:13 AM »

As you all know, I believe Herold was assigned to be the assassin of Johnson. Atzerodt was not going to do it and Booth knew it so he gave the job to Herold. Herold, from what I've read, was a young man of lower than average intelligence who hero worshiped Booth. He could have been talked into it by Booth far easier than Atzerodt.

At this point we need to make clear what was planned and what occurred as a result of circumstances.
Anything that happened before 10pm was planned. After that it was every man for himself.

If you look at what was planned you can readily see that Atzerodt was going to be sacrificed when Herold purposely left Booth's jacket containing the map southward in his room. I believe that Booth meant to lure the posse southward by throwing enough red meat to the wolves following him.  He mentioned the southward route to the guard at the bridge and even had Mary Surratt leave his field glasses along the trail. Meanwhile, he would turn northward and use the train system to escape to Canada.

When Herold was unable to kill Johnson because he stupidly left his gun in Atzerodt' s locked room, he took off after Booth like a lost dog after his master. Booth never planned on traveling with Herold because one man can blend easier into a crowd than 2 or 3. Booth's broken leg was his unforeseen circumstance that allowed Herold to catch up with him and help him get treatment.

Thats how I see it. Booth didn't give a rip about anybody but himself and his own escape. Mary Surratt, Lewis Powell, Davy Herold and George Atzerodt were all to be sacrificed....and they were.

BTW - Does anyone know whatever happened to Booth's field glasses?

Jerry 


That's a really interesting and intriguing point.   
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