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Author Topic: Question re Dr. Mudd  (Read 756 times)
Nan
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« on: July 08, 2012, 06:06:55 AM »

On the Sunday after the assassination, Dr. Mudd met his brother George at church and told him about the two suspicious persons that arrived at his house in the early morning hours on Saturday, and asked that George report this to the military authorities in the area (most would agree that Mudd was just covering his bases with this request).  But, if Dr. Mudd had not drawn attention to himself in this manner would his involvement with Booth have remained a secret or were there other clues that would have eventually led investigators to him?
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Nan
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« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2012, 06:13:19 AM »

     Great question, Nan. I'm thinking no. I think the only reason Booth was found at Garrett's is because of his tie to Willie Jett, who directed the Feds there. I don't see that with the visit to Mudd.
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Randal
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« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2012, 07:00:24 AM »

I think he would be tied going to Mudd's IF Mudd didn't tell his brother. The reason being, Atzerodt's confession would have led them there (to Mudd's farmhouse)
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Nan
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« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2012, 07:44:49 AM »

OK, so they would have caught up with Mudd anyway ........ and the self-reporting via George didn't do him any good.
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Nan
Joe Gleason
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« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2012, 08:51:35 AM »

Nan,
Randal brings up a good point about Atzerodt's confession. It might have taken the feds a little longer if brother George hadn't informed about the men at
Dr. Mudd's, but they still would have been led there one way or the other. Adding Lloyd's statement about Booth wanting to see a doctor to Atzerodt's 
"Dr. Mudd knew all about it" would, IMO, have sent the feds immediately to the Mudd's house.  Wink
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Nan
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« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2012, 09:01:51 AM »

Yep, I forgot about that dang ole Atzerodt and his confession.  I wonder if the tip off by George to the feds, which was brought up at the Trial, did Mudd any good at all (life in prison vs hanging).
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Nan
Gene C
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« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2012, 11:28:59 AM »

The Fed's backtracked Booth's movements and would have found out eventually about Mudd through Herold, or in finding out who set Booth's leg. 

By Mudd telling his brother about his "visitors" it made it look less like he had something to hide.  And Mudd's main difficulty was his evasiveness in how he answered questions and volunteered information.   He only offered up Booth's boot when he realized the Fed's were going to search his house.  If he hadn't initiated contact with Federal authorities indirectly, I think it's likely they might have hung him too.
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Randal
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« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2012, 11:40:28 AM »

Maybe, and please, don't bring up the same 'ol Freddie Stone song and dance,"His prevarications were painful", etc. Stone KNEW about the plot against Lincoln from the get-go. Whether it went from Kidnap to Murder, he knew. Stone was just covering his a$$ when he stated that. Wink
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Gene C
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« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2012, 11:45:36 AM »

Randall,

How do you know he knew?  (I don't know much about Stone)

I always wondered what might have happend if Booth had made it to Bowling Green and hopped on the train.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2012, 11:48:48 AM by Gene C » Logged

The more you know, the more you think the less you know, because you know that you don't know.  The less you know the more you think the more you know, because you don't know that you don't know. 
 (Not bad for an old dog)
Randal
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« Reply #9 on: July 08, 2012, 11:57:20 AM »

If I recall correctly,  the authorities Knew that Booth was involved with Mudd after the assassination, via Atzerodt's statement to his brother-in-law on the 25th, the same day Jett ratted Booth out that Booth was at Locust Hill.

The fed's didn't have to back-track Booth's movements, they knew he already left Mudd's.

Attorney Frederick Stone who represented conspirators Mudd and Herold, "financed" the boat, for the previous attempt to kidnap Lincoln and made his infamous, self-serving "prevarication" statement to the New York Tribune in 1883.

Atty. Stone, knowing what he knew, I imagine, had to be squirming in his chair everytime the "kidnap plot" was brought up during testimony!
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jonathan
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« Reply #10 on: July 09, 2012, 03:44:03 PM »

I'm not sure how Stone's statement after Mudd's death is all that self serving. He basically confessed to helping to defend a man who he says was obviously guilty. To me, that makes him look worse. And as I've asked before, if Stone was in fact aware of the kidnap plot, doesn't that make his statement about Mudd even worse for Mudd? To me, if someone who is suspected of being in on it says that I was in on it too, that looks much worse for me, while having little effect on him. We have to keep in mind also that this was what, 18 years later? I'm not sure Stone needed to lie about it at that point.

Anyway, I think they would have caught up with Mudd regardless , though I suppose it's very possible he could have avoided the prison sentence. If he had just helped Booth and Herold and sent them on their way the next day, never saying a word, Mudd might be a footnote today rather than a whole chapter. 
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"I try not to break the rules, but merely to test their elasticity" - Bill Veeck
Randal
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« Reply #11 on: July 09, 2012, 04:28:42 PM »

Jonathan
What I meant by self-serving is, Stone expresses his thought that Mudd as guilty, all the while, he knew he was involved in the original plot, or was culpable by some degree and deflected that (guilt) by saying Mudd was close to be hanged, by his (Mudd's) statements.
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