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Author Topic: "Twenty Days"  (Read 3283 times)
Joe Gleason
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« on: October 21, 2010, 04:13:13 PM »

Were the Kunhardt's wrong or just mistaken when they claimed that this was Ned Spangler in the crowd at Lincoln's second inaugural address?
I don't think this is Ned Spangler. Any opinions?

 

                                                        View Library of Congress photos here. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2009633604/
                                                        LoC librarians recommend  http://www.alternatiff.com/ to help your computer open TIFF files.
                                                        
                                                                                                                  
                                                                                                                  




« Last Edit: November 15, 2011, 06:26:37 PM by Joe Gleason » Logged
Roger Norton
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« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2010, 04:27:00 PM »

Joe, in The Lincoln Murder Conspiracies, Dr. William Hanchett writes, "In Twenty Days (1865), Dorothy Meserve Kunhardt and Philip B. Kunhardt, Jr., have combined hundreds of magnificently reproduced contemporary photographs and other pictures with an informed and judicious narrative of the assassination, its background and aftermath. One regrets only their claim to have identified Booth and some of the men associated with him in an enlarged (and well-publicized) photograph of the ceremony at Lincolnís second inauguration, March 4, 1865."

Although I don't always agree with Dr. Hanchett on everything, I do agree with his analysis as stated above.  I think this is particularly true with a guy like Spangler.  I have never read that he hung with Booth's crowd. Other than Booth, I am not sure any of the others ever came into contact with Spangler.

The man identified as Booth could possibly be him I suppose, but I have my doubts on the others, most particularly Spangler.
« Last Edit: October 21, 2010, 04:32:09 PM by Roger Norton » Logged
Joe Gleason
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« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2010, 05:38:19 PM »

On top is the damaged photograph shown in Twenty Days. At bottom is a LOC photo in high resolution taken just seconds after. This person wasn't visible in the
Kunhardt's photo (top) but is visible in the high res. photo. Did he have a beard, or is it just a shadow?


                                                                                                                                                      Did Spangler have a beard or is it just a shadow?

« Last Edit: October 27, 2011, 01:12:07 PM by Joe Gleason » Logged
Joe Gleason
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« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2010, 06:14:24 PM »

Maybe he borrowed one of Wiechmann's uniforms.  Either way, based on this testimony, I think we might agree that Booth and Surratt were there for the inauguration.        

Testimony of Louis Wiechmann;

Q. Can you tell what occurred on the 3rd of March, 1865, whether you saw Surratt or Booth?
A. Yes, sir.
Q. Where?
A. I went down the street with Surratt in the evening that day. At that time there was a good deal of serenading around town on account of the proposed inauguration for the President on the following day. After a while Surratt left me, and I went to hear the music.
Q. Whom did you first go out with?
A. John Surratt.
Q. Did anybody join you?
Q. Was there anybody else with you when you first went out?
A. No, sir.
Q. You came back together?
A. No, sir; we did not come back together; Surratt left me.
Q. Wher did he leave you?
A. On Penn. Ave., near Eighth street.
Q. Then what occurred?
A. When I returned to the house of Mrs. Surratt I saw John Wilkes Booth and John Surratt in the parlor talking together.
Q. About what time did you return?
A. After 7 (PM)
Q. Then what occurred?
A. Then I proposed that we should walk up to the Capitol. Congress was in session. Three of us did go- Surratt , Booth and myself. When we were returning from the      Capitol, Surratt and I left Booth at the corner of 6th & Penn. Ave.
Q. What did Surratt then do?
A. We went home.
Q. Did you see Booth again that night?
A. No.sir.
Q. And after you and Surratt got home, what?
A. Nothing.
Q. Did you see Booth the next morning, the 4th of March?
A. I saw him on the evening of the 4th, at Mrs. Surratt's. I didn't see him during the day.
Q. Was John Surratt home that evening?
Q. Yes, sir, he had been riding around town all day with the procession; he was on horseback.


March 1, 1865.
The inauguration must take place. There are no means of reaching him before. The best laid scheme seems blocked on every side. But the opportunity will come yet.

March 2nd
Have arranged all our plans, and secured the required assistance. They all seem ready to do anything to secure success. I don't think that young fellow Herold has much
courage; but then, he may be made of use by-and-by. The risk is great but the reward greater. We have all we want for the work- everything except for the opportunity.


March 3rd
Too closely surrounded by his friends. No chance before the inauguration. The city is full, and all the office seekers are buzzing around him like so many bees. Can't yet be done.

March 4th
The inauguration is over, and nothing done yet. My hopes and prospects rest solely on this attempt, and should it fail, I am ruined forever.

                                                                                                            The Private Journal of John H. Surratt

                                                                                                                                                    
Comparison photos of John Surratt. LOC vs. Papal Guard uniform.
               

note; Lew Powell was identified in Federal uniform by Maggie Branson. " He said he wanted to cross the lines"  ( The Evidence pg. 197)
Although no evidence exists to confirm it, John Surratt may have used a Federal uniform in his "line crossing" and clandestine activities as a confederate courier.

Col. J. L. McPhail
Pro. Mar. Gen.
War Dept.
Washington City, DC
April 24th 1865
Hon. E. M. Stanton
Sec. of War
                                
(excerpt)
Sir,
                    
            A man named Harbourn living near Piscataway, Prince Georges County, Md. ; now stopping with some relations near Bryantown, Charles County , Md. ,
       name not recollected, was associated with Surratt in blockade-running, and was seen with Surratt in Port Tobacco in February or March.

                 Respectfully
                       J.L. McPhail

« Last Edit: January 13, 2012, 06:24:18 PM by Joe Gleason » Logged
Dave Taylor
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« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2010, 09:02:32 PM »

While I don't think the conspirators were there, I was under the impression that Booth was.  While you can't see him in the most popular image of Lincoln's 2nd inaugural, I assumed the ones in the Gutmans' book were legitimate.  Is this not a currently held belief?
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Joe Gleason
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« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2010, 09:30:39 AM »

Dave, I'll post the Gutman photos that you made for another post. Nice copies btw!

The Kunhardts claim that this is George Atzerodt.  

IMO, the man standing next to him looks more like Atzerodt.
Twenty Days photo vs. LOC photo of George Arzerodt.
Twenty Days photo vs. Atzerodt on the gallows.
Close up.

« Last Edit: November 09, 2011, 09:15:07 AM by Joe Gleason » Logged
Joe Gleason
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« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2010, 09:43:11 AM »

Gutman photos.

                                John Wilkes Booth?         (Photo from a post by Dave Taylor)
« Last Edit: October 21, 2011, 05:53:04 PM by Joe Gleason » Logged
Joe Gleason
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« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2010, 10:07:27 AM »

In my opinion, the Kunhardts correctly identified Davy "chippy cheeks" Herold.  Grin
                                                            

"He has been in the habit of being home during the present year. Sometimes he would be away over a week visiting in Maryland. During the month of March he has been away visiting quite often, nearly always at home as late as March. During March I don't think he would be gone more than one day at a time. He sold his horse six weeks ago. He had it nearly a year."
                                                                                                                           Jane E. Herold
                                                                                                                           April 20, 1865

question; Why would Herold sell his horse around the time of the inauguration?  Roll Eyes
« Last Edit: November 06, 2011, 05:41:43 PM by Joe Gleason » Logged
Joe Gleason
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« Reply #8 on: October 22, 2010, 10:42:20 AM »

I'll end my conspiracy theory for the day with the other person dressed in uniform to the right of center of both pictures. In the Days pic, the soldier is standing with a fixed bayonet, a bright beam just beneath the tip.  In the next photo, the soldier has put down the weapon and seems to be attending to a person sitting with their head fallen forward, as if incapacitated. He is wearing a coat that is very similar to the one worn by the man behind him.  The soldier in the Twenty Days photo is looking directly over his shoulder and in the next photo (in high resolution) appears to be calling out to the man in the lower right corner.


  
« Last Edit: November 09, 2011, 12:11:10 PM by Joe Gleason » Logged
Joe Gleason
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« Reply #9 on: October 22, 2010, 03:35:58 PM »

....maybe   .... maybe not....  Undecided    

                                                  
  


 



                                                          
                                                                                                                                       TwentyDays vs. later photo of Dr. Mudd
« Last Edit: November 10, 2011, 09:42:50 AM by Joe Gleason » Logged
leaycraft
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« Reply #10 on: October 22, 2010, 05:18:39 PM »

Joe has done yoemen work in his postings.  I have sat with Joe on several occasions and we have discussed the identities.  I am not convinced of the ids of anyone but possibly Booth.  If there were another photograph even the HD of the inaugural from LOC is not overly convincing.  One problem with this photo besides low resolution aat high magnification is that the style of clothing , and hats are so similar distinctions are made more difficult.   I cant imagine why sNed would wnat to go to this event.  He was not in Booth's inner circle and had no motive to attend; from what I know of his personality and interests I seriously cant believe he really cared.   

Now Je is postulating Dr. Mudd is attending the event.  My question is why?  Can't believe he would want to be there. 

I'm not convinced.
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Joe Gleason
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« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2010, 07:04:27 PM »

John,
I will always value your opinion on any subject concerning the assassination.  Thanks for your input on this post as well.  Because the photos are of such poor
quality, the most I was hoping for was to show some of the very slight similarities between the men in question.  You're right, why would any of them except
Booth want be at the inaugural. They weren't exactly part of the fanclub. It's a tough call, but something was going on at the time of the inauguration.  

Col Foster's report concerning Louis J. Wiechmann. (The Evidence pg. 1322)

                                                                    ..on one occasion a witness says about the time of the inauguration
                                                                     he (Wiechmann) spoke in relation to a plot which he thought was to
                                                                     assasinate all of the officers.



Excrerpt from testimony of Louis J. Wiechmann;

                                                                     Friday evening she(Mrs. Surratt) chased the young ladies and myself upstairs
                                                                       to our room and remained alone in the parlor. Some six or eight weeks before,
                                                                       when accompanying her to church, I asked her why John brought such fellows as
                                                                       Atzerodt & Herold to the house and associated with them. She said John wished
                                                                       to make use of them.
[/i]
« Last Edit: December 22, 2011, 07:06:46 PM by Joe Gleason » Logged
Joe Gleason
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« Reply #12 on: June 20, 2011, 06:05:16 PM »

Sorry Betty. I had to delete my post .: Laurie Verge
                      




 








« Last Edit: August 15, 2012, 06:16:37 AM by Joe Gleason » Logged
Dan
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« Reply #13 on: June 20, 2011, 06:21:53 PM »

I just picked up Roscoe's "Web" the other day. Quite the book, and I'm only 24 pages in!
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Randal
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« Reply #14 on: June 20, 2011, 06:55:49 PM »

Good choice Dan!
When you are finished with that, read Vaughn Shelton's ! Wink (with apologies to Betty) Grin
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