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Author Topic: Booth's layovers  (Read 7137 times)
Joe Gleason
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« Reply #30 on: July 20, 2011, 08:58:53 AM »

Single snaffle bit.


Double bridle




« Last Edit: July 21, 2011, 07:23:22 AM by Joe Gleason » Logged
Joe Gleason
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« Reply #31 on: July 20, 2011, 09:20:29 AM »

Thanks Betty. This is the stirrup from what I believe to be David Herold's grey roan. The ladies saddle horse.

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Joe Gleason
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« Reply #32 on: July 20, 2011, 09:55:10 AM »

This is an excerpt from the testimony of James Pumphrey, the livery stable keeper that rented Booth's bay mare.
Q. What color was the mare?
A. She was a bay mare, about 14 hands high. I put on her an english saddle, and snaffle bit bridlle. I have never seen the saddle, bridle or Booth since.

Excerpt from the testimony of John Fletcher, the person that rented the grey roan to David Herold.
Q. Did he (Herold) tell you what he wanted the horse for?
A. He said he was going riding with a lady.
Q. What did you say to that?
A. I said nothing to it.
Q. Did he inquire for any particular horse?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What horse?
A. A light color roan horse in the stable named Charley.
Q. Did he get that horse?
A. Yes Sir
Q. What else did he want?
A. He wanted an english saddle and bridle to the same horse.
Q. Did he say anything about the stirrups of the saddle?
A. Yes Sir, I showed him a saddle on which there were military stirrups, but he did not like this so well as the english saddle and stirrups.
Q. What kind of bridle did he select?
A. A double reined bridle with two bits.
Q. Is there any single fact to mark him that would give a more complete description then you have given?
A. No Sir, only that his back was sore from wearing a ladies saddle.

 
« Last Edit: July 21, 2011, 04:41:23 AM by Joe Gleason » Logged
rich smyth
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« Reply #33 on: July 20, 2011, 09:58:47 AM »

Hi Joe,

Very interesting and very good argument for the shooting of the horses. Did you find the items you posted pics of or did the farmer? I do not know the area but if it is a swamp how else would the items be left there?
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Joe Gleason
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« Reply #34 on: July 20, 2011, 10:16:13 AM »

Betty,  I am not a horse person. I did however manage to locate the " Laurie Verge" of the equestrian world, IMO, right here in Charles Co. If anyone is interested in going head to head over identification with my source, be my guest. I, on the other hand, am pretty fascinated by the "farmer's find" and wanted to share it.  At the end of the day I can say this; While it is impossible to say with certainty that these relics were on those horses, I feel as though the story carries a little more weight than others.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2012, 10:19:06 AM by Joe Gleason » Logged
Joe Gleason
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« Reply #35 on: July 20, 2011, 10:29:28 AM »

Thanks Rich,
The farmer did find all of the items that I have shown. He just didn't realize what he had, and to be honest, I didn't either until I started researching. That was about three years ago.
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« Reply #36 on: July 20, 2011, 10:50:27 AM »

Joe,

You've always had me convinced that something happened on Mr. Watson's farm, and this was a great way to lay out everything you have.  If Cox Jr's statment is correct, then I believe you have found the spot where the horses died.  Whether that is their tack, I don't know but it's certainly cool enough to hang on to.  Keep up the good work Mr. Gleason.
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Joe Gleason
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« Reply #37 on: July 20, 2011, 11:03:53 AM »

Thanks Dave, and I will!
I don't think I took you up on the hill the last time you were here, so here is a view from "the hill" at Point"B" looking down toward the swamp. Thanks again Betty!

« Last Edit: July 20, 2011, 11:06:06 AM by Joe Gleason » Logged
Randal
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« Reply #38 on: July 20, 2011, 01:00:00 PM »

Joe,
What type of metal is the stirrups made from? Cast? Or heated steel? I meant, cast iron.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2011, 01:13:41 PM by Randal » Logged

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Joe Gleason
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« Reply #39 on: July 20, 2011, 01:51:25 PM »

I'll have to check. I know that I discussed forged / cast while at the horse farm, but let me double check on it.  Again, I'm not very knowledgeable about that end of the business and I can't find the stupid cheeseburger wrapper that I wrote my notes on that day.  Angry  I'll stop by the farm tomorrow and let you know. Smiley
« Last Edit: July 20, 2011, 01:54:03 PM by Joe Gleason » Logged
Joe Gleason
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« Reply #40 on: July 21, 2011, 07:30:39 AM »

Randal,
The stirrup is cast iron (?)
« Last Edit: May 21, 2012, 02:32:39 PM by Joe Gleason » Logged
Randal
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« Reply #41 on: July 21, 2011, 05:00:15 PM »

Randal,
The stirrup is cast iron.

If it is cast iron, and 150+ years old, it would be disintegrated by rust, attributed by the tannins (tannic acid) in the swamp Joe. Alloys with a higher than 2.1% carbon content are known as cast iron because of their lower melting point and castability. Cast iron also breaks easily if it hit's a hard object. Wrought iron was the standard in the day for stirrups. These were heated by high heat and hammered out. I seriously doubt those stirrups are 150 years old if they are indeed cast iron. I know a little bit about this from a welding class I took years ago and we had to study metallurgy. Wink

 
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Joe Gleason
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« Reply #42 on: July 21, 2011, 06:03:19 PM »

I am just guessing here, but if Herold wanted to go riding with a lady and wanted an english saddle, wouldn't Fletcher just put the smaller "ladies" stirrups on the english saddle? I don't think we are dealing with a side saddle here. No sir, not Davey! Help me out here Betty. Herold told Fletcher that he was going to ride with a lady but only rented one horse, would that mean that Herold and the lady were riding the same horse?

Laurie,
I thought it was a button because it is only the size of a dime. I found a comparison made by The Waterbury Button Company.

Randal,
There is obvious and severe deterioration of theses relics. They have remained in a very freshwater enviornment. Without a proper tannic acid level test in this area of the Zekiah and a metal composition test, it's kind of tough to make that call. My question is this. Based on the story, are the relics worthy of futher testing?



Correction!This button has been eliminated from the evidence. It is dated 1902.
  



« Last Edit: March 23, 2012, 07:59:42 PM by Joe Gleason » Logged
Randal
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« Reply #43 on: July 21, 2011, 06:45:18 PM »

Joe,
Tannins leach into fresh water, salt water or brackish water. However, tannins are neutralized by the salt content or salinity. Tannins do the most damage in fresh water. Also the pH content, (and I haven't tested it,) in the Zechkia, would be very low almost off the chart from 7, which is neutral. I would bet probably a pH reading of 3, (in the swamp) which would be very acidic, and that accelerates rusting. Plus you factor in temperature fluxes, and ice/snow in the swamp along with the time factor of how long it had been immersed in the swamp.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2011, 06:51:13 PM by Randal » Logged

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Randal
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« Reply #44 on: July 21, 2011, 07:13:21 PM »

Neil Young said it best: "Rust Never Sleeps"  Wink
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